Agency Best Practice

Proactive Strategies for Amazon Account Health Excellence

play

Podcast transcript

Introduction

Hi, everyone, and welcome to another live episode of Marketplace Masters, sponsored by MerchantSpring, your go-to for marketplace analytics. We dive deep into the world of e-commerce, addressing the challenges agencies face in improving performance, including maintaining robust Account Health for their clients. 

 

Paul Sonneveld
I'm your host, Paul Sonneveld, and today we're going to explore and understand the intricacies of Amazon Account Health and how to effectively respond when seller account issues arise. I've invited Leah McHugh to join us and share her valuable expertise and perspectives on how to achieve this. 

Now, let me introduce her first. Leah is the Amazon Seller Consultant at eCommerceChris and helps sellers communicate with Amazon to protect and save their business. In the last eight years, she has consulted with hundreds of eCommerce companies on Amazon compliance issues, that includes block listings and suspensions, and help sellers avoid unneeded headaches by teaching them how to find out if they're at risk for these problems before it's too late. 

Leah is also the co-creator of the Seller Performance Solutions podcast and membership, which is all about showing sellers how to review their accounts the way Amazon teams do and how to communicate with them in the Amazon way. Thank you so much for being on today's show, Leah.

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, thank you so much for having me.

Paul Sonneveld
This is a topic that is really dear to my heart, because Seller Health is one of the main reasons we built MerchantSpring many years ago. I don't want to plug it, but we were running an agency at the time, and some of our customers got suspended. We weren't monitoring it properly. We weren't doing things properly. And It really bit us in the backside, so to speak. So it was rather painful and something good came out of it, but a couple of scars still remain. 

But for those that are tuning in that are not familiar with the concept of Seller Health, maybe let's just start there, right? Leah, maybe you can start by explaining what is this concept of Amazon Account Health? And why is it really crucial for brands and sellers and agency to prioritize this aspect? And I would say particularly in the context of maybe those that have been selling on Shopify for a while, and they've just moved on to Amazon, why should they care?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, so Account Health is, it's sort of a multi-use term that Amazon uses. Most Amazon sellers are most familiar with it in terms of their Account Health Dashboard. So when you log into your Seller Central account, you have a Dashboard and it's supposed to give you an overview of how healthy your account is. And that is based on how many times Amazon has had to warn you about a policy violation or take down your listings. So that's how most sellers are familiar with it. 

They're also generally familiar with the Account Health team, who is the team that you can call when you get a notification from Amazon saying that you've done something wrong, and they can try to fill you in on what you need to do. Internal to Amazon though, it's a little bit more complex. So, what you see on the Account Health Dashboard is a good place to start when you're looking at Account Health, but an Amazon investigator has access to a lot more data and actually will be looking at your account as a whole. 

So they had to warn you about things more than once. Have they had to repeatedly warn you and you're ignoring their warnings and they're still seeing the problems? And so they use that data to decide whether or not they want you on the platform and whether or not they should suspend your account or to send another warning.

Paul Sonneveld
Excellent. I would love to get into those Amazon investigators. Surely, I always thought it was AI bots sending you messages, but we'll get onto that in a second.

Leah Mchugh
No, I work with two former ones.

Paul Sonneveld
Maybe let's unpack it a little bit further. What are the most common Account Seller Health issues that sellers run into? And what's the link between the issue and the impact on their business?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, it depends on the kind of product, I would say probably the most common is condition complaints. So product was used, if you get a use sold as new warning, or a warning that you've sent defective inventory, those are probably the most common across all product categories. But then you also get things like IP infringement complaints, which are pretty common across most product categories, or the new potential IP infringement complaint, which actually isn't a complaint it's Amazon's AI bots going through the catalogue and looking for potential violations of other people's intellectual property.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah. Now, maybe just for the sake of completeness, you mentioned a couple of examples there. What are the kind of buckets that Amazon looks at when it comes to Seller Account Health? What are the areas that are part of that review?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, so intellectual property complaints is a big one, as is product quality. But then you also get into product safety and product compliance. And then the last, but certainly not least, because this is one of the big ones, is section three of the Seller Agreement Violations, which tends to relate to some sort of abusive conduct on your account, often anti-competitive type behaviour.

Paul Sonneveld
Right. OK. Just introduce, what would be an example of that. I'm sort of picking my brain now.

Leah Mchugh
I have many examples of that. But probably one that most sellers have experienced is somebody going into your listing and adding keywords to your product to make it look like an illegal product in order to get that ASIN taken down for a few days.

Paul Sonneveld
Get it. Makes sense. Cool. All right. For those sellers and brands sort of on the start of the journey with Amazon, what are the sort of effective strategies and tools that you recommend they put in place? Just practical things that they should be doing, whether it be weekly, daily, or monthly, what advice do you have?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, so a lot of those tips are really off Amazon things. So you know, if you're sending a product into Amazon, you need to have some sort of quality control system in place. So you don't get quality complaints or defective complaints because of possibly a manufacturing error, or an error in your warehouse sending bad inventory to Amazon. A lot of those are really off-Amazon things. But I also recommend that all sellers familiarize themselves with Amazon's policies. 

A surprising number of sellers don't do this and end up running afoul of policies without even realizing that they're doing it, particularly on the listing compliance side of things. We regularly see sellers violating those policies because they just don't know them. And I understand that Amazon's policy pages are not the most user-friendly, and it does require a lot of clicking through to different pages. 

But you certainly want to make sure that you're reading the general policies, certainly the Amazon Sellers Agreement, and then also the pages that are specific to your product category or product type. Those are really the best proactive steps that you can take. And then obviously, try not to infringe on somebody else's IP.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah. Well, of course, we'll get into, hey, when you do get into Robins, how do you kind of do some of the proactive things? But in terms of proactiveness, are there, obviously, there's understanding the policies and trying to adhere to those. What can the sellers do to try and understand where issues might pop up? Are there any metrics or any things inside the platform that they should keep an eye on? Because they may translate into an issue down the road when it comes to Seller Health.

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, absolutely. So, they definitely want to be reviewing the Account Health Dashboard daily. You do also generally get an email if there is a policy warning added to your Dashboard, but they don't always get sent properly. So definitely check your Account Health Dashboard daily. There's also a number of metrics that Amazon now gives you, like voice of the customer which is quite useful in finding any sort of trends with product quality issues. 

Return reasons from the returns report is also a really good thing to be keeping track of because you can often identify problems there with quality before Amazon identifies them and then you can pull that inventory before it results in a nascent suspension. I also recommend regularly reviewing your listing content in Seller Central and also using a category listing report, which you can download from the inventory reports options in Amazon, because that gives you one, all of your contributions to the listing.

And then if you look in the back end, you can also see other people's contributions to your listing to make sure that there's no illegal claims being made, that their product is accurately represented and any required warnings or anything like that are still showing on the listing. And also you can make sure that you're not accidentally listing against an incorrect variation, which is a policy warning, and also making sure that you're not violating any of Amazon's listings policies.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah, no, that makes sense. And I just want to skip back to the terms and conditions and the policies and all of that. Really two questions, where did I find them? And how do I even stay up to date? I'm sure Amazon makes changes to these. So where can I physically if I want to just want to take some time this weekend to read over to make sure I'm not missing anything, where do I go? And is there a good place where I can stay informed of any changes?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, so within Seller Central, you can access all of their policy pages. The easiest way I find is to just type into the search bar at the top of Seller Central what it is I'm looking for. Some of their policies are visible externally if you're not logged in, but most of them are actually, you have to be logged into Seller Central in order to review them. 

Like I said, they don't have a great structure in terms of read this first and then keep going in a sequential order, but it’s there and they are making it a little bit better in terms of showing the breadcrumbs of where you are and how it relates to everything. But that is unfortunately the best place to see the policies. 

And then in terms of keeping up to date with changes, Amazon does generally inform you when they make major changes to the policies. It's usually on the first page when you log into Seller Central it shows news that's often where you'll see policy changes but they do also quietly sometimes change policy wording and unfortunately there isn't a great way on Amazon to keep up to date with that but certainly I would say being engaged with the industry is probably the best way to keep up to date with these changes. 

Whenever there's any sort of change, people within the industry tends to pick up on it pretty quickly and also are pretty quick to start giving advice. And I will say that there is a lot of bad advice on the internet. So make sure you're picking and choosing whose advice you're listening to. But being a part of the industry, being part of Amazon seller groups, going to conferences, and networking with the people that are looking at this every day across multiple accounts is the best way to keep up to date with changes on Amazon.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah, no, fantastic. Fantastic. All right, so let's move into issue territory. I still remember getting an email from Amazon saying, I can't remember the exact wording and it may have changed, but your account has been flagged or is being at risk. And when you get an email like that, particularly if a large part of your business is now relying on Amazon, you've built your whole brand there, it can be a very scary experience. Talk me through, what does that mean from Amazon's perspective? So, you received an at-risk notice or email, your account has been downgraded. What does that mean and what's happening in the background?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, so that's actually an improvement. They used to not tell you in advance. You would just get a notification saying that your account is now suspended. And now you have to appeal it in order to get it back a few years ago. And also because the EU made them change it in the EU. They now give you a few days warning. Sometimes it's 48 hours. Sometimes it's 72 hours. They tend to change the wording throughout different periods of the year. 

But it essentially means that your account was flagged for review internally within Amazon. An investigator in the seller performance team generally reviewed your account. And rather than sending another warning or blocking another listing, they have decided that they no longer want you as a seller, or at least they want you to make major changes to your operations before they will allow you to continue selling on Amazon.

And so now they tend to push you towards speaking with Account Health which is a newer team in the last few years, for greater details in order to address whatever the issue may be within that time period to stop the account from being suspended. And so the first thing that I would recommend sellers do is actually read the entire notification, which I understand sounds ridiculous, but it's amazing how many sellers either read it, but they're panicking, and so it doesn't really sink in or they just see the headline and immediately go to respond to it. 

And that is actually generally the worst thing you can do because usually that results in sellers sending a very emotional response, which Amazon doesn't care about, or sending completely incorrect information and You only have so many shots at appealing before they stop taking you seriously. And so sending in that sort of emotional, nonsensical, not accurate response just gives them an excuse to ignore anything that you send later.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah, that's certainly hard, right? Particularly if you're if that's your business, your livelihood, but you know, take a deep breath, maybe come back to it tomorrow, have a good night's sleep and try to look at it kind of objectively. So how would you recommend like, how do you counsel your clients around you've received this? What are the appropriate kind of ways to respond?

Leah Mchugh
It really depends on why the account is suspended and it is very different for the different kinds of suspension reasons. So, it's hard to answer that generally, but often they will be asking you for a plan of action. They are doing that less and less on certain types of suspensions, but there are still some suspensions where Amazon is asking you to send a plan of action. 

And again, for a lot of sellers, their immediate response is to try to write that and send that as quick as possible. Their idea being that the faster they send it, the faster the issue will be resolved and the faster their account will be reinstated. Again, that's a mistake. The plan of action should really be the last thing that you do. The first thing you need to do is really investigate what went wrong. And I will say that most of the time, Amazon is correct on why they are suspending your account, but they do sometimes make mistakes. There are definitely occasions where Amazon makes a mistake or another seller made it look like you did things that you didn't do. 

So the first thing you need to do is investigate your own operations and your own account to one, verify that it actually happened, and then two, figure out why it happened. A lot of sellers, when they write their appeal or their plan of action, tend to just regurgitate what Amazon told them the reason for the suspension was. And Amazon's not looking for that. They already know that. What they want to know is what went wrong in your operations that led to that issue that made them suspend you. And if you don't nail the root causes, they won't read the rest of your appeal. That gives your investigator a great excuse to maintain their KPIs and just immediately reject it. 

Investigators have a very short period of time to review these. So you want to make sure that you nail the root causes and then once you've nailed the root causes then you need to get into, okay well what do we need to do right now to resolve the immediate issue? And then the third section is what do you need to do operationally to make sure that this issue never happens again? So that's on the plan of action side. More and more we're seeing Amazon requiring a dispute in order to get reinstated. And so that means that you need to be able to prove to Amazon that you did not do what they are accusing you of doing. 

And that, again, it depends on what the suspension is for as to what that documentation would look like. If it's IP infringement, then you need to be able to provide trademark certificates, letters of approval, whatever the case may be, product compliance, you'll need to provide that certification. If it's abuse, then you need to show them. It's difficult to prove that you didn't do something, but you need to be able to provide them some sort of documentation to support your dispute in that matter.

Paul Sonneveld
So you mentioned something before around the plan of action. Were you saying before, I just want to make sure I heard you right, that it's a plan of action, a documented plan that you then submit is one response, but no longer always has to be the response, like other ways of responding in terms of responding to Seller Health issues, or is it still always comes down to some sort of written document or email where you kind of explain that you've investigated the issue, and you've taken, you know, you put steps in place to prevent it from going forward, etc, or, you know, provide documentation? 

Is it always that sort of that correspondence form in terms of getting back? Or because you mentioned kind of real people before, which is music to my ears. It's probably seems to be an area where actually you can get hold of someone. You know, is it more of a hey, let's have a conversation and agree this verbally? I mean, what does it look like in terms of that process?

Leah Mchugh
So, you can have a conversation with the Account Health team. The Account Health team doesn't have any authority in terms of reinstating your account though. So, the team generally for account suspension that you are dealing with without seeing is a seller performance team. That's a siloed team within Amazon. So, you have no way of contacting them directly. 

So, the Account Health team was created in order to give sellers essentially a point of contact to liaise between the two teams. So, Account Health can give you information as to the nature of the suspension. They can tell you what is needed in the plan of action. But I will say in terms of Account Health, they do have a tendency of giving their opinion, which isn't always the same as the opinion of the investigator that gets to decide if you get reinstated. 

So, if you are speaking to Account Health, you need to make sure that anything that they tell you, you're confirming that that is from the investigator's notes on the account. and not just their opinion. So, most appeals still require some form of written response, but they are not always asking for a plan of action anymore, which is, again, why it's very important to read the notification, because we still see a lot of sellers sending in a plan of action when one hasn't been asked for. And particularly on the compliance side, which is the side that I work on the most, The compliance team don't want to see a plan of action. They're just going to immediately ignore that. The compliance team want to see that your product complies with the laws.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah, they just want the evidence or documentation, certificates, or whatever that might be.

Leah Mchugh
Right, either an explanation or documentation, because sometimes there isn't documentation if your product isn't a drug. You're not going to have something from the FDA that says your product isn't a drug. But you need to explain to them why they're wrong, why this is correct, what has happened. Maybe you need to remove something from your product detail page. but they're just looking for proof that is compliant. And similarly, we'll see that with intellectual property infringements as well. Less often Amazon's asking for those plans of action, more often they're just asking for documentation or having the complaints retracted.

Paul Sonneveld
Yes, excellent. So I'm wondering if you would be able to share just maybe a couple of examples that you've worked on in the last few weeks or months doesn't really matter just to give people a flavour of what's the issue? How do we respond? And also, you know, did it get resolved and how long that process take? Certainly, I remember having to submit multiple plans of action. 

It took probably kind of two weeks end to end at the time. I seem to get rejected a lot, very quickly, which is very frustrating. And it's my belief that I was talking to a bot, maybe a mistaken belief. But yeah, I'd love to hear some examples, Leah, if you of course, you know, not interested in client commercial, confidential details, but just general case studies would be awesome.

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, so one that I've been seeing quite a lot of recently, again because I work a lot on the product compliance side of things, are listings being removed because Amazon has miscategorized them or another seller has come and affected your listing in a way that got it miscategorized and suddenly Amazon's asking you for documentation that has nothing to do with your product or are restricting you because you aren't approved to sell that type of product. 

And so again, you're generally dealing with a compliance team. The issue with the compliance team, I would say in the last six months or so, is that the compliance team used to be essentially a legal team inside of Amazon. So, they were fairly familiar with the topic, they knew the laws, and a lot of them were actually attorneys. Now what we're seeing is that it's treated more as a low-level team. 

And so they have the requirements that listed down on their tools. And if you don't meet those requirements, their automatic reaction is just to reject it, they don't really have the ability to be like, oh, this is a totally different product, we were wrong. let's reinstate it. And so more and more on those sorts of cases, we're actually having to escalate it above the compliance team in order to get a real response that isn't just a template telling you that your product is something that you've just documented to them. It's not. 

So usually that requires emailing into escalation queues. I would say Jeff at Amazon is the most well-known one. I haven't used that in a while. Technically, Dharmesh is head of the compliance team now as head of marketplace. That's also a well-known one. Normally, we do have to escalate those sorts of cases up the chain in order to get it properly reviewed and not just the same rejection template that you got in the first place.

Paul Sonneveld
So, on some of the more recent examples you worked on, what does that cycle look like? How many times do you sort of get rejected until you find a resolution? Or what can, so for example, what will be your general advice be around, hey, if I try and get something resolved, how much patience and time and preparedness should I think about before this issue gets resolved?

Leah Mchugh
It's hard to give timelines with Amazon. A lot of it really depends on how busy that particular team is at any given moment. 

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah. Of course.

Leah McHugh
I will say in general, though, if you submit something and five minutes later, you get a rejection, it probably hasn't been reviewed properly. A lot of times it hasn't even been sent to the right team when you get a response that quickly. So, I don't know. My cases run anything from resolved within 24 hours to a couple of months for the really tricky ones. People ask me for timelines all the time, and I can never give them a good answer, unfortunately. 

But there is a specific pattern that you should be following. And so you definitely need to still submit whatever Amazon is asking for. You need to follow their instructions, even if you know like I kind of do at this point, that it's not going to work because you need to have that as your basis of escalation. Like, hey, I did what you told me to do to resolve this. It is still not resolved. This needs to be escalated to reviewed by a competent person with an Amazon who can actually review this properly and resolve it properly. 


I think a lot of sellers like to jump straight into the escalation thinking that it'll get it resolved quicker, but they don't have any basis for escalation there. And also we see a lot of sellers with not very good appeals or not the right documentation trying to escalate things and that's not going to get them anywhere because it'll just get re-reviewed and rejected again and now you've burnt a bridge to get it resolved potentially later when you do have the right information.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah. So I think the, just for our audience then, I think it's important to note that it is likely going to be iterative. You may get lucky and get something resolved really quickly, but that's probably outside the norm. It's going to be iterative and it may take some time, right? and focus. So just to manage expectations.


Leah Mchugh
Yeah. And you also often need to make changes yourself, either within the account or to the product or to the listing. 

Paul Sonneveld
And that takes time.

Leah McHugh
Yeah.

Paul Sonneveld
You need to invest time in that. Yeah, no, completely. Are there any, issues that you've come across where you say, guys, or sellers, I'm very sorry. But this is such a serious issue. I don't think you can ever get your account reinstated, or that issue resolved. You know, unfortunately, that's the end of your Amazon journey, or at least this Seller Account. Do those scenarios exist? And what would be examples of them?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, absolutely. So, if you commit fraud, if you knowingly commit fraud, that is, there's really no coming back from that. So you know, if Amazon asks you for documentation, and you don't have it, so you just decide to make it yourself. That makes the system the situation far worse than just not having that documentation. If they think you're engaging in any sort of fraudulent behaviour, often they'll actually just completely sign you out of the account. And so you don't have access and there's no path to reinstatement. 

We'll also see that a lot on the abuse side of things. So if you're caught engaging in any sort of abusive behaviour towards other sellers or manipulating sales rank, things like that, more and more we're seeing that there's no path to reinstatement. And then also the other side, sometimes people just come to us too late where the appeal was handled badly and they made such a mess of it that so many bridges have been burned with bad escalations, which we call the spam a lot approach where they just send the same bad escalation to as many Amazon emails as they can find. 

Getting Amazon to pay attention to you again after that and take you seriously is very difficult. And there have been a few of those where we have gotten them reinstated, but sometimes we just don't even take those cases because it's just too much of a mess has been created.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah, a little too late to really do something useful there. Wow, that's super interesting. Sounds like don't lie, don't pray and spray, and be proactive. If you're not sure, engage someone like yourselves really early on in the process. A little side question from here, just kind of, there used to be, well, I don't know if it still exists, but this idea of not being able to run multiple seller accounts as sellers. Is that still the case? Question one, and a follow up question, if my account does get suspended or deactivated permanently, can I open up a new account? So those two questions.

Leah Mchugh
So, in answer to the first question, they did change that policy a number of years ago. So, you are allowed to have multiple accounts as long as there's a legitimate business reason for you having multiple accounts, and you shouldn't sell the same products across your multiple accounts. So, if you have multiple brands that are totally different products, that's absolutely allowed to have multiple accounts as long as they're separate businesses with separate tax IDs. 

Similarly, agencies are obviously logging into a number of accounts, and that's all within policy. Where sellers get into trouble here is where they're opening multiple accounts to try to gain a competitive advantage. So, if they want to own all 10 offers on an ASIN, which we really don't see that much of anymore because I don't think it actually gave that much of a competitive advantage, but those accounts will still be related within Amazon's tools. 

So, if one account gets suspended, the other accounts will be suspended for being related to that suspended account. So it isn't, I think some people think it's like an insurance policy, having these additional accounts. It's not. Amazon knows that they're related to each other, and they will suspend the other ones for being related to the first one. You then need to resolve that first suspension in order to get all of the accounts back. And we see that on the brand registry side as well. 

If any of your selling accounts are suspended, or even if you're related to a selling account, they will also suspend your access to brand registry until the first account gets reinstated. The answer to can you open another account after you are suspended and can't get reinstated is no. I know some people say it's possible by masking all of your IP and information and I'm sure it is for a time, but it's as soon as Amazon finds the relation to the suspended account, they will suspend that new account.

Paul Sonneveld
It's a little bit like your fraud comment earlier, like you can pretend to be something else or make things up, but eventually, you're going to get find out and obviously, you're still not compliant on that.

Leah Mchugh
Right. And so again, the only way to get reinstated is to get that original account reinstated for whatever it was suspended for.

Paul Sonneveld
Awesome. Cool. We're running out of time, but I do have a couple of questions coming in. So, I thought I might just bring them up and have a go at answering them. I've got quite a long one here from John. John, thank you so much for joining us today and throwing the question there. But for inaccurate categorization on policy violations, how would you address issues where Amazon changes your category, making the issue, or will not accept the category change. 

In other words, it wasn't you that put the product in that category. Experiencing greater pushback in this area compared to the past. Any help and tips would be appreciated. So, the issues of policy violation as a result of categorizations that are beyond your control and you can't seem to change it back.

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, we've been seeing a lot more pushback there too. And we've also sometimes Amazon's teams can't talk to each other. So sometimes the catalogue team actually changes the categorization because of new categories. And then the performance team then suspends you for being in the wrong category. 

The best way to correct it, in my experience, is to upload a flat file update and then try to get the catalogue team to push the change through. Once the listing is blocked, it's actually harder. So if you can catch it before the listing is blocked, it's a lot easier to make that change. But again, depending on the category and depending if it's a compliance issue, which generally speaking, category problems either end up being a compliance issue or a listing policy issue. 

If it's a compliance issue, we do find that you have to generally escalate that to get it resolved. If it's another seller doing it, though, I would also recommend sending that to the abuse teams, as an abuse report. And you can also, you can get quite a lot of information from the catalogue team as to who made the change. They obviously won't tell you exactly who it is, but if they tell you that it was a retail contribution, generally what that means is that another seller used Vendor Central to mess with your listing. And you can report that to the abuse team to one, correct the listing and to take action against whoever made the incorrect category change.

Paul Sonneveld
Yeah, great. Appreciate those tips. I've got one from Will here. Will, thanks for submitting this question. He's asking, have you had any lucky reinstating sellers who have violated Amazon's review manipulation policy?

Leah Mchugh
Yes, but it is getting harder. And it has been for a number of years because Amazon has been making it very clear that they don't want review manipulation for a number of years. Also, towards the end of last year, the FTC actually fined an Amazon seller for review manipulation. And so whenever a government agency starts caring, Amazon starts caring as well, which tends to make it more difficult to get reinstated. That being said, we are seeing a lot less account suspensions for review manipulation. And, well, that's not true. 

We're seeing less account suspensions for messaging, for like review messaging. If you request a review the wrong way, they tend to just suspend your ability to send those messages. But it really depends on what sort of review manipulation was taking place as to whether or not they can get reinstated. So, we do get them reinstated, but it depends on how bad the manipulation was.

Paul Sonneveld
Thank you. That's great, Leah. We are out of time. We have to wrap it up here. First of all, I just want to thank you for joining me today and really helping us unpack this topic of Seller Health and giving us some great examples and managing our expectations along the way as well. It's been absolutely fantastic. So I appreciate that.

I know this is the second podcast you're doing today. So, at some point, you'll get to do some normal stuff again. But of course, very important. You're an LD person to know and to get hold of when you do run into issues. So what is the best way for those listening that need expertise in the area of Amazon Seller Health, and particularly around reinstatements or proactive strategies? What's the best way for them to get hold of you?

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, so if they just go to ecommercechris.com, all of our information is there. We have a contact form or welcome to email me directly, leah@ecommercechris.com. And we're on all of the social platforms like everybody else's.

Paul Sonneveld
Fantastic. Well, thank you so much for being on the show, Leah.

Leah Mchugh
Yeah, thank you so much for having me, Paul. It's always nice talking to you.

Paul Sonneveld
Take care. All right, that is it for this episode of Marketplace Masters. Thank you so much for tuning in to today's episode on Amazon Seller or Amazon Account Health. Now, if you are hungry for more, don't forget to visit our video on-demand library on our website for a whole treasure trove of you know, agency best practice and Amazon vendor insights. And of course, if you are aiming to streamline your analytics and set up some automated Amazon Account Health monitoring to gain sharper insights, why not reach out to us and discover how MerchantSpring can just transform your journey. 

Lastly, I am all ears in terms of what you'd like to hear next. We've just started 2024. I'm looking for great suggestions, topics, and speakers. So, if you've got a burning question in mind, or you can think of a great speaker to get on the show, please share them with me via the messaging system in LinkedIn. Make sure to share your future episodes with us. Now, until next time, please keep thriving, keep innovating, and thank you so much for listening. Take care.

Iphone-angle

Learn more in our FREE product demo!

Witness first-hand how MerchantSpring can help you streamline insights and reporting for your e-commerce portfolio. Watch it LIVE!